IoT Security Blog

Articles and Posts on IoT Security, Embedded Systems, and the Internet of Things

Dr. Iris Anshel, Chief Scientist of SecureRF chosen for Connected World’s 2018 Women of IoT Award

Dr. Iris Anshel, Chief Scientist of SecureRF, has been chosen to receive Connected World’s 2018 Women of IoT Award. The award, previously the Women of M2M (WoM2M), is in its sixth year and recognizes women who have been trailblazers and innovators in the IoT enterprise. The class of 2018 Women of IoT Award recipients are…
Read More

Meet 20 of the Most Powerful Women in Technology

Dr. Iris Anshel, Chief Scientist at SecureRF, has been included in a select list of  20 of the most influential women in technology as reported by Yolande D’Mello in her article for AiThority. Dr. Anshel earned a Ph.D. in math from Columbia, co-developed the foundational group theoretic methods that underlie all SecureRF protocols, and has…
Read More

Automotive Opportunity and Security Challenges for Silicon Companies

SecureRF recently participated as an exhibitor at the GSA Silicon Summit, held April 19 in San Jose, California. The event offered attendees a great opportunity to connect with many of the leading and emerging players in the semiconductor ecosystem and also learn about new trends in the industry. While a number of interesting topics were…
Read More

WalnutDSA Presented at NIST’s First PQC Standardization Conference

On April 11, NIST held their first Post-Quantum Cryptography (PQC) Standardization Conference, an important milestone in the project and the effort to find and standardize quantum-resistant security solutions. More about this project and SecureRF’s involvement can be found here. The workshop brought together presenters of more than 60 submitted solutions to NIST’s call for quantum-resistant,…
Read More

On the Path to a Secure Boot Solution for RISC-V

As the RISC-V ISA gains in popularity and more industries proceed with plans to build and deploy systems based on RISC-V technologies, the security requirements of those systems will grow. One avenue that hackers have used to exploit systems has been to modify the firmware and cause it to misbehave. For example, one of the…
Read More

NIST Post-Quantum Cryptography Standardization Project and SecureRF

Quantum computing is moving  from theory to reality. MIT and commercial entities including IBM, Microsoft, and Google have already delivered elementary quantum computing platforms. When large-enough quantum computers are built, known algorithms will be able to weaken or break most of the public-key methods now in use. Concerns over the security threat this represents are…
Read More

Bloomberg: Most Connected Devices are Easy to Hack. This Company Says it Can Fix That.

Most smart, connected devices are often easy to hack because they have low-power, low-resource processors, making current methods of security impractical or impossible. As a result, these devices, and the networks they are connected to, are vulnerable to attack. SecureRF has an answer–its solutions are aimed specifically at protecting the low-power processors that run internet-connected appliances and other…
Read More

SecureRF to Showcase Future-Proof Security Solutions for Low-Resource Processors at Embedded World 2018

IoT developers looking for quantum-resistant authentication and data protection solutions for their embedded devices and processors will find the smallest and fastest solutions from SecureRF on display at Embedded World 2018.   We will be giving live demonstrations of their methods that are more than 90 times faster than ECC daily on the show floor. The…
Read More

IoT Security News: Attacks, Encryption and WAP3

The new year kicked off with major security-related news. On January 3, we learned that billions of CPUs are vulnerable to the Meltdown and Spectre side-channel attacks, which can be used to access sensitive data, including passwords, cryptography keys, and files. Since then, chip makers and cloud service providers have been scrambling to develop and…
Read More

An Update on Spectre and Meltdown

Computer owners, beware! In early January, we learned about two massive security flaws in most of the CPUs used in computers built during the past two decades. Attackers can use the flaws, named Spectre and Meltdown, to access sensitive data stored in a computer chip, including passwords and files. During the past several weeks, the…
Read More

Archives